Accessibility Links

UK digital adspend on the up

18/10/2013

The amount of money spent on digital advertising continued to increase over the last six months as more consumers responded to this kind of content, according to the latest report from the Internet Advertising Bureau (IAB).

Research from the trade body found advertisers spent a record sum of £3.04 billion on their digital offering over the first six months of 2014.

With Britons now spending an average of 43 hours a month online, it is clear that organisations without a web-based advertising campaign are missing out.

Some 22 per cent of UK internet time across tablets, mobile and laptops is spent on entertainment, with social networks and blogging accounting for 12 per cent of the total. Other aspects of the UK web experience include directory inquiries, email and retail.

Tim Elkington, director of research and information at the IAB, said: "Nothing illustrates the internet as an entertainment platform better than the fact that over one in five minutes online is accounted for by entertainment and that advertisers spent almost 1,300 per cent more on mobile video than a year ago."

He predicted that the growing penetration of smartphones across the market and the roll-out of the 4G network could make 2013 the year mobile advertising spend reaches beyond the £1 billion mark.

Consumer goods became the biggest spender on mobile display in the first half of the year, moving up from 14.5 per cent to 26.8 per cent to overtake the entertainment and media sector.

This indicates that mobile has moved on from being an entertainment-focused platform to being a genuine player in the retail industry, argued Anna Bartz of PricewaterhouseCoopers.

A recent report from Adobe revealed that UK marketers could be lacking some confidence in their ability to produce strong digital content, despite positive figures such as the IAB's.

Only 48 per cent of respondents to the survey felt 'highly proficient' in the range of skills involved in digital marketing, with many citing a lack of training as a major problem.