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Google offering new marketing class - is it worth it?

01/08/2013

The fast-changing world of marketing, especially in the digital sector, calls for staff who are willing to improve their skills over the course of their employment, rather than simply gaining one qualification or role and sitting on their hands for the rest of their working life.

In some ways, it is the responsibilities of businesses to up-skill their staff as they move up the ladder, and some of the top-performing marketing firms in the UK excel at launching innovative and engaging training programmes.

But should workers look to improve their talents externally? Will this help them gain exciting new roles or perform better in their existing position? New courses such as the one being offered by tech giant Google assume that it will.

It has launched a programme called Squared, aimed at improving the digital skills gap and helping graduates and young professionals learn more about the marketing industry, reports the Evening Standard.

The programme costs £1,000 to get on to, and will be launched online from August 22nd so anyone interested can take part remotely.

It has already been piloted in the real world with a six-week course for graduate workers from the capital's marketing and advertising agencies.

Camilla Clarkson, 26, a media planner at Mindshare, told the newspaper she learned a number of useful skills on the programme that she will be able to take back into her role.

Course leader Sarah Tate revealed that an impressive 86 per cent of those who graduated from Squared have since been promoted or given more responsibility in their workplace, suggesting that courses of this kind can have a positive impact on your career.

"Experiential learning is a great way to get skills that you need for the workplace," she added.

While box-ticking and pointless learning exercises should be avoided, the success of the Google scheme simply highlights how important it is that digital marketers stay ahead of the curve.

Whether this is through tailored schemes such as Squared or simply by taking on novel internal projects, it gives younger staff the chance to stand out from their more experienced counterparts.